knitting

June Sisters Audio Podcast, Episode 5: Summer knitting, canning, and reenacting…all in one episode.

Show notes for the November 9th, 2017 Episode

Click on the audio player above to listen!  Time stamps are noted for each section in the show notes.  Feel free to skip to sections that you are interested in.  Links to patterns and other resources can be found by scrolling over highlighted text.

You can find me on social media at the links below:

Instagram @ debihassler

Facebook @ Debi Graham Hassler

Facebook @ June Sisters Knitting

Ravelry @ debihassler

Etsy @ JuneSisters

Email:  debi@erikphotographic.com

Summer 2017 (1:08)

Family reunions, camping, gardening, canning, and FLEECES!

 

 

 

In the Suds

(3:01)

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The Drop-Shoulder Cardigan by Amy Hertzog

The Starting Point Wrap by Joji Locatelli

The Tealeaf Cardigan by Bristol Ivy

Selbu Mittens by Skeindeer Knits

Walk in the Woods by Lisa Hannes

The Antler Hat by Tin Can Knits

Sign up today…..Ravelry!!!

Knitting Now

(6:52)

The Selbu mittens…washed and blocked mitten on the left, unblocked mitten on the right.  See what a difference washing and blocking makes?


Skeindeer Knits’ Mystery Mitten KAL

Curious Handmade’s Knitvent 2017

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My current sock WIP knit with West Yorkshire Spinners 4-ply BFL wool/nylon yarn.

Spinning

(10:07)

Gary Lawson Sheep Shearing

Corriedale Fleece:  Purchased at The Booneville Music and Fiber Festival in April 2017

 

 

 

The Present Cowl by Mademoiselle C:  This is an excellent one-skein pattern for handspun yarn.  It produces both garter and stockinette fabric and is a great test of the fabric your handspun can produce.

Lincoln Fleece:  Purchased from The Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial Living Farm in July 2017.

 

 

 


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Lincoln Feather and Fan Shawl


Lincoln Cabled Socks:  A simple cable-patterned sock by me!  Pattern coming soon.

#wovember on Instagram

Sewing

(16:25)


17th Century Clothing Patterns purchased at The Feast of the Hunters’ Moon

What fills my cup

(17:30)

Italian Sausage, Kale, and Tortellini Soup

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Larder = A room or large cupboard for storing food.




Mrs. M’s Curiosity Cabinet Podcast:  A wool pantry!!!

As always, thank you for listening and happy knitting!

Music by MaxKo Music, licensed by Envato Market.

(With special thanks and appreciation to my technical advisor, audio repairman, an all-around-good-guy, Eric.)

 

 

 

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June Sisters Audio Podcast, Episode 4: Spinning….because knitting isn’t weird enough.

Show notes for the April 27, 2017 Episode

Click on the audio player above to listen!  Time stamps are noted for each section in the show notes.  Feel free to skip to sections that you are interested in.  Links to patterns and other resources can be found by scrolling over highlighted text.

You can find me on social media at the links below:

Instagram @ debihassler

Facebook @ Debi Graham Hassler

Facebook @ June Sisters Knitting

Ravelry @ debihassler

Etsy @ JuneSisters

Email:  debi@erikphotographic.com

In the Suds

(1:04)

 

Chief’s Wollmeise socks, knit cuff down with a plain stockinette leg and foot, slip-stitch heel flap and gusset, and rounded toe using US 1, 9-inch Addi circular needles.

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West Yorkshire Spinners 4-ply wool in the Bullfinch color way using US 1, Hiya Hiya double points and my standard vanilla sock recipe.

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The 2017 Shetland Wool Week Patron hat, The Bousta Beanie by Gudrun Johnston knit out of scraps of Paton’s Classic Worsted.  Here’s the link to my Ravelry project page and modifications for knitting a worsted weight version.

Shetland Wool Week

 

Beloved by Solenn Couix-Loarer, and Hello Baby Hat by Susan B. Anderson.

IMG_9351The Baby Aviator by Julie Taylor with vintage buttons.

Knitting Now

(6:36)

Amy Hertzog’s Craftsy class:  Sweater Modifications for a Custom Fit.

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Swatching and doing sweater math with Cloudborn Merino, alpaca, and silk in the charcoal-heather color way.

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In this example, there are 19 full stitches between the pins measuring 3-1/8 inches apart.

19 / 3-1/8 = 19 / 3.125 (converting the fraction to a decimal) = 6.08 stitches per inch.  Exactly.

Custom Fit website by Amy Hertzog.

Spinning

(9:45)

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Sampling and record keeping.

 

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Ashland Bay Merino in the Cabo color way by Jean Elizabeth Fiber Arts Studio.

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Natural Corriedale from Sheepish Creations on Etsy, spun and dyed with black walnut and knit into Amy King’s Corinthian Cowl.

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Peruvian Highland wool in dark, natural gray spun short-forward draw with a traditional two-ply.   I’m dream knitting about this spin.

Sewing

(14:57)

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New Look pattern #S1084.

 

 

Inspiration from the 70s and a very faded photograph of me wearing my favorite outfit when I met Emmett Kelly, the famous clown.

What Fills My Cup

(16:53)

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A wooden ironing board used as a yarn-winding station.

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Vintage clothespins, buttons,  glove mold, and wooden spools rest on a Chief-made, reclaimed-wood shelf in my sewing room.

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A child’s vintage 1960 toy “spinning wheel” (spool knitter) is a good place for a few hanks of spindle-spun wool to sit.

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Old rusty sheep shears hang on a peg in the great room.

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Yes, we even have restored working crank phones in the house and studio because texting or calling on cell phones between the two buildings is too easy.

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The portable church pew in our studio.  You can also see a rescued wooden elevator gate on the wall and lamp made out of a vintage camera tripod in the corner.

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The church pew’s former home.

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In the garden, the hops are vigorously growing and climbing.

As always, thanks for listening and happy knitting (and spinning if knitting isn’t weird enough for you, too).

Music by MaxKo Music, licensed by Envato Market.

JuneSisters Audio Podcast, Episode 3: It’s been awhile but I have a good excuse

Show notes for the March 23, 2017 Episode

Click on the audio player below to listen!  Time stamps are noted for each section in the show notes.  Feel free to skip to sections that you are interested in.

You can find me on social media at the links below:

Instagram @ debihassler

Facebook @ Debi Graham Hassler

Facebook @ June Sisters Knitting

Ravelry @ debihassler

Etsy @ JuneSisters

Email:  debi@erikphotographic.com

You can find me on social media at the links below:

Instagram @ debihassler

Facebook @ Debi Graham Hassler

Facebook @ June Sisters Knitting

Ravelry @ debihassler

Etsy @ JuneSisters

Email:  debi@erikphotographic.com

(and a little self-design)

Hannah Fettig, Texture

(1:42) Waverly Hat, adapted from the Waverly Cowl pattern by Hannah Fettig.

Pup Tent Hat by Catherine Gamroth.

Handbrake Cowl by Kay Jones.

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(5:55) Dreaming of Trees Wrap.

Fringe Association, “Texture by the Yard” blog post.

(10:32) Mercury Socks.

Knitting Now

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(12:00) Chief’s Wollmeise Socks.

The Loopy Ewe.

Sewing

(13:23)IMG_9223

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Spinning

(14:44)4A2ACD19-AACA-4FEE-AFE8-A16D24947F33

Lacy at The Woolery.

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The Present Cowl

(20:56)

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Happy Spring and thank you for listening!

Music by MaxKo Music, licensed by Envato Market.

JuneSisters Audio Podcast, Episode 2:  Cowls for Everyone

Show Notes for the January 26, 2017 Episode

Click on the audio player below to listen!

You can find me on social media at the links below!

Instagram @ debihassler

Facebook @ Debi Graham Hassler

Facebook @ June Sisters Knitting

Ravelry @ debihassler

Etsy @ JuneSisters

Email:  junesisterspodcast@yahoo.com

Details about this episode’s finished knits can be found can be found in episode 1.

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Debi’s sock recipe.

Purl Soho’s Lovely Ribbed Cowl.

Waverly by Hannah Fettig.


Respect theSpindle by Amy Franquemont.

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From right to left:  Progression of consistency in spindle-spun yarn.

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Crocheting hand-spun into a granny stripe blanket.

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Jumper + Void Shawl by Melanie Berg

Stitch Marker Tutorial

Tools and supplies needed include small wire snips, round nose pliers, one 3-inch head pin, two alphabet beads, three small glass or decorative beads, and two 9 mm jump rings.

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Place the alphabet beads and glass beads on the end pin as shown.

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Using the round nose pliers, form a loop at the end of the head pin.


Push the beads toward the loop and cut off the excess pin with the wire snips leaving enough pin to form a loop on that side.


Using the round pliers once again, form a loop on the cut end.


Attach the jump rings to the loops at each end.


Your stitch markers are ready to use!

My Etsy shop.

London Fog Recipe

Brew one cup or teapot of Earl Grey tea.  Sweeten to taste with honey.

In the meantime, steam and froth 1/2 cup of milk + 1 teaspoon vanilla with an espresso machine or milk frother.  If you don’t have either, warm milk in the microwave and froth with a whisk.

Fill your tea cup or mug with Earl Grey, then carefully spoon the frothed milk on top.  Sip and enjoy!

Thank you for listening!

Music by MaxKo Music, licensed by Envato Market.

JuneSisters Audio Podcast, Episode 1:  Make it Lovely

Show Notes for the January 8, 2017 Episode

Click on the audio player below to listen!

You can find me on

Instagram @ debihassler

Facebook @ Debi Graham Hassler

@ JuneSisters

Ravelry@debihassler

Email:  junesisterspodcast@yahoo.com


My first knitting, more than 45 years ago.

Paton’s Kroy Socks in the Grey Brown Marl colorway.


Debi’s Vanilla Socks.


Germany knits:  Precious Cowl by Nadia Crétin-Léchenne, Pebbles Socks by Mina Philipp, Crofthoose Hat by Ella Gordon, Sockhead Hat for Chief by Kelly McClure, and Pup Tent Hat and cowl (adapted by me) for Cameron by Catherine Gamroth.


Messy Bun Hat by Melanie K. Ham.  Lion Brand Wool-Ease Thick and Quick in the Blackstone colorway.


Tiny Christmas Hat Ornament by Debi Hassler.


Kork Nisse Knit by Jennifer Edwards.


Schoppel Wolle Zauberball Crazy in the Frische Fische colorway (which means “fresh fish” 😜).
Little Bobbins Knits Christmas Eve Cast On #lbkchristmasevesocks2016.

Purl Soho Lovely Ribbed Cowl.  Kraemer Yarns Naturally Nazareth in the Hickory colorway.  “Thanks” #kraemeryarns for the shoutout on Instagram!

Chief’s Hemingway Cowl.
Kromski drop spindles.

Hygge: a Danish and Norwegian word with a unique definition, although very similar to Gemütlichkeit. Hygge as a noun includes a feeling, a social atmosphere, and an action. It includes something nice, cozy, safe, and known. The word is more than a physical state, instead the Danish and Norwegian word focus on a psychological state. Hygge is a state where all psychological needs are in balance.



Fringe Association
Never Not Knitting
Debi’s Blog from Germany

Me and Chief atop the dome of the Frauenkirche in Dresden, Germany.

Music by MaxKo Music, licensed by Envato Market.

Audio engineering assistance was provided by Eric Hassler, aka Chief.

I finished my first {motorcycle knitting} project and lived to tell about it.

imageIt’s just a little cotton dishcloth, but it’s the first knitting project that I’ve completed while riding as a passenger on the motorcycle.  This is what I learned:

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1.  Use circular needles.  I started out using straight needles but my motorcycle knitting mentor quickly reminded me to use circular ones.  If I drop a needle from one hand, my work won’t go anywhere, like down the highway.   Genius.  Thank you, Judy Theuerkauf.  For this project, I used 16″ 5 US/3.75 mm circular needles.  Perfect.

2.  Pick a small project.  Cotton dishcloths are the perfect size to keep behind and low.  “Flappage” is a major issue.  Keep your project size small to control flappage.  I’m not sure that flappage is a word, but you get what I mean.  At 70 miles an hour, you gotta control the flappage.

3.  Use a yarn with tooth.  I love Sugar ‘n Cream and this color is called Blue Jeans.  One-hundred percent cotton yarn has some grip to it and with that wind whipping by, you need all the grip you can get.  Save the alpaca for another day.

4.  Pick a pattern with an easy repeat.  There’s no room in your lap for a book or instruction sheet.  The pattern almost needs to be one that you can memorize.  Sometimes I cheat and write an abbreviated pattern on a post-it note and stick it inside my pack (see #7 below for pack info).  I love this little pattern book by Leisure Arts that has tons of nifty patterns that keep me amused and are quick learns.

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5.  Pull the skein from the inside so that there’s no tangling or a lot of excess live yarn.  If you pull too much, it will fly toward the front of the motorcycle and you don’t want to give your driver any distractions.  Chief can put up with an occasional needle point in the back, but yarn flying past his helmet is a no-no.

6.  Cast on and begin a couple of rows before you get on the bike.  You’ll have a firm start as you begin knitting on the road.

7.  Use something to contain and control your yarn.  Thank goodness I saved all of our 80’s fanny packs because they are perfect for this purpose.  I know you’re thinking, “thank goodness,” too.  I double-loop the strap around Chief’s backrest and it sits perfectly in front of me.  My hank of yarn is in the big zippered pouch and it’s zipped so that there’s only just enough room for the yarn to easily pull through.  So handy.  What to do if your bike doesn’t have a back rest?  I think you could strap the fanny pack to your thigh or put it on loosely around your waist, or Judy suggests pulling the yarn from a small day pack worn by the driver.   Another great idea!  Bonus points for the fanny pack >>>> the handy front pocket is a great keeper for my cell phone.

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See, I’ve already started my next project.

8.  Don’t give up easily.

Okay.  I probably need to answer this question for you…exactly WHY IN THE WORLD are you knitting on a motorcycle?  Well, I love to knit AND I love to ride a motorcycle.

Because, this happens

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riding on the Indianapolis Motor Speedway,

and thisimagesunset rides across Southern Indiana,

and this

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these are my people.

And sometimes, we take the interstate to make time, which isn’t particularly interesting and is sometimes, monotonous.  Knitting helps to pass the time on those long stretches of road and I really enjoy it.  It does, however, take a little practice and adjustment to conquer the wind and the bumps and the flappage.  DON’T GIVE UP.   You can do this.  Just like learning a new stitch or series of stitches, you’ll get the hang of it and you’ll be cruising along before you know it.

Are you a knitter?  Do you knit anywhere unusual? Tell me all about it…

I’m casting on my next project and we’re hitting the road!

#harleydavidson #riderforlife #everydayworkdate